Vipassana Research Project_2_Can humiliating past experiences distracts Vipassana Practitioners?

Let me start by wishing all the blog readers – a very happy, prosperous New Year!!

Let me start by wishing all the blog readers – a very happy, prosperous New Year!!

At times, we are told traditionally to divert the attention to positive thoughts when some undesirable memories occupy our mind. We are often advised to chant some mantra or chant a prayer or just remember God or visualise God’s image so that we can divert the attention of the mind.

All these methods do not solve the problem but only supress the problem from conscious mind to sub-conscious or unconscious part of the mind. As and when situation arises these supressed thoughts surface out in mind and make us uncomfortable. The problem remains hidden and gets activated in response to external stimuli. Accumulation of such thoughts over a period of time further complicates the problem.

One of the basic principles of Vipassana is accept the situation as it is. Vipassana recommends objective observation of the thoughts that are surfacing in the mind. I just need to remain non-judgemental to each passing thought. Thoughts will arise – I remain indifferent to them – however humiliating or discomforting they might be – I don’t judge them – I see as these thoughts pass by and slowly that changes habit patter n of the mind. Mind becomes non-responsive to the outside stimuli or thoughts.

In my research I tried to find out how the Vipassana meditator and non-meditators react to thoughts of humiliating past experience. The statement was – “When thoughts of humiliating experience occupy my mind, distraction works best for me”.

Vipassana_Research_Distraction

Vipassana Meditators: In response to this statement, 84 % of Vipassana meditators responded with ‘Never’ or ‘Rarely’. In other words, whopping 84 % practioners do not use distraction as a tool to move away from thoughts of humiliating experience. Only 16 % participants responded that they ‘ Always’ or ‘ Most of the Time’ use distraction Vipassana meditators face reality as it is and don’t use distraction. Although we cannot conclusively conclude that these Vipassana practioners practice Vipassana or maintain equanimity when humiliating thoughts surface their minds, there is a high probability of that happening.

Vipassana Non-Meditators: In response to the statement, only 31 % responded with ‘Never’ or ‘Rarely’ and remaining 69 % participants responded that they ‘ Always’ or ‘ Most of the Time’ use distraction when humiliating thoughts occupy their mind.

Although I cannot conclude that Vipassana only is responsible for such staggering differences, the difference in responses between these groups is evident and it positively favours Vipassana meditators.

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2 thoughts on “Vipassana Research Project_2_Can humiliating past experiences distracts Vipassana Practitioners?

  1. the more one is attached to the object / person who became media for such an experience. the more is the distraction. its like the waves during monsoon in sea/ocean. Mind is not ready to look deeper. I have to practice Anapana for long durations, sometime with open eyes while doing work.

    1. There are some of such incidents which have made deep impression in last 8-9 years. They are like sleeping volcanoes. Time and again they arise and subside. Whenever they arise it makes me miserable. The only thing I try to do is observe respiration with open eyes and not to throw that anger on others and make them miserable, including the person / object who was the media for the incident.

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